Sunday, September 14, 2008

About collecting scissors

It is still relatively uncommon for people to collect scissors and this gives the hobby many advantages. The key advantage being that interesting antique (100 year old +) and vintage (50-100 years old) scissors can be acquired for very little money. Almost all of the scissors shown on this blog were purchased cheaply, about $5 for a vintage pair, about $10 for an antique pair--for a mixed lot the per scissor price is often only about a dollar. As I am not interested in museum specimen quality, but actually prefer tools that have seen use, wear and even repair, I have acquired a large and interesting collection primarily of larger vintage linear design scissor--the kind I find most attractive.

There are many interesting types of scissor to collect. Some people prefer the ornate designs, medical scissors, or very early examples. Foldable scissors are fascinating and take up very little space. Candle snuffers are no longer useful to most people and so even very old examples may be purchased for a few dollars. And for the more macho collector there are many models of scissor that doubled as daggers, for a lady's self-defense. If you are more interested in creating scissor art, modern scissors can be bought cheaply in bulk secondary to airport seizures.

If you also collect scissors or even just have a few interesting or rare example, I would love to see pictures and to link to any related blogs.

11 comments:

  1. Hi, This rescuelifeproducts. I purchased a pair of W.C.H. scissors a few days ago.
    The are #7 & #6 overs-sized.
    I can be located on http://www.iantiqueonline.ning.com/rescuelifeproducts.

    I will post a picture on that site as soon as possible. rescuelife, robert jones.

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  2. cute! But I will keep my money in my pocket.

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  3. you collect scissors?

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  4. I prefer used tools too and buy anything that is intriguing to me. Today I found an interesting pair of scissors / shears. They come marked 'Compton U-Set', 'Made in USA' and a serial number'834SO...?'. The cutting part of the tool is shaped like a bishop's hat or lobster claw and one blade is serrated. Handles are black. My first thought is that they are a form of 'pinking shear' but they are not heavy.Any ideas. I'd post a photo or send you one if i knew how.All the best.Nice site.
    Dylan in Vermont

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  5. I discovered that on the shears/scissors mentioned above by me, the 'serial/model#' actually reads 834SU7-1/2 (7 1/2 being the length in inches.)One 3-finger and one single finger grip.

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  6. I also should have written 'not quite as heavy as pinking shears' but they are still 7+ ozs.

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  7. Ever come across a pair of Kleen Cut brand safety scissors that have four finger rings in a line (2 on each "scis") like a set of brass knuckles?

    They appear to be child sized holes, but can't imagine how anyone would use them with one hand... they're very odd.

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    1. aren't they used to teach someone how to cut ?

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  8. How does one reset the spring in Compton U-set Thread Scissors? The scissors came apart (I removed the screw) and the spring is a "devil" to re-insert. How? I tried squeezing the spring and more, but the manufacturer must have used a special tool. I am about to give up and buy another of the same. The Compton U-Set is very handy.

    Dom

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  9. Hi - I'm looking for experts to interview about what makes good pair of scissors for The Sweet Home.com. Please contact me.

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    Replies
    1. You can contact me at veinglory at gmail.com

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